Effective Utilization of the Incident Command System in a High-Reliability Environment

Carmine Nogara

Abstract


The incident command system (ICS) is a standardized method of managing emergency incidents caused by fires, accidents, hazardous materials, and other natural or human-caused disasters.  ICS is a flexible system that consists of established procedures for managing resources such as personnel, equipment, and communications. This study includes the examination of a suburban volunteer fire department’s use of ICS at all incidents.  The utilization of interdisciplinary training methods, post-incident assessment techniques, and formation of strategic alliances are identified as the primary components that contribute to the effective management of an incident.

Keywords


high-reliability organizations, strategic management, incident command system

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18533/ijbsr.v4i6.512

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